Posts Tagged ‘tech’

The Future Looks Fast

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

Last month, Full Court Press had the opportunity to support our client and friends from US Ignite at their annual US Ignite Application Summit in Austin, Texas. The three day summit showcases some of the country’s most forward thinking devices and applications for the world’s smart cities.

The deluge of information exchanged at the conference was somewhat overwhelming, so Caitlin Scott from our team (@caityscott) broke it down into the three top highlights about the next generation of smart, connected cities built on ultra high speed gigabit broadband infrastructure. From where we sit the future looks collaborative, fast, and diverse.

 

US Ignite Co-Founder and COO, Joe Kochan

 

Collaboration is Key

One of the many noteworthy panels at the US Ignite Application Summit featured technology officers from cities throughout the country. Each panelist had plenty of wisdom to share, but the pieces about collaboration stuck out in my mind.

Samir Saini, CIO of Atlanta pointed out that sharing and collaboration is a superpower among city leaders— I agree, and  would argue that sharing and collaboration is a superpower all humans possess but often underutilize. Seattle CIO Michael Mattmiller added onto this by saying that municipal CIOs are now being asked by local mayors and other elected officials to creatively use technology to solve non-technological problems such as closing the digital divide, leveraging big data to better serve the community, and more.

It may feel as though CIOs are being asked to solve the most pressing and intractable problems of communities. By collaborating and sharing knowledge across municipalities, CIOs in all corners of the country can learn from each other’s best practices and crowdsource solutions to solve these seemingly daunting problems. The US Ignite Applications Summit served as an excellent platform for relationship-building, knowledge-sharing, and an opportunity for experts to convene and learn from each other.

3×3: Three Experts Answer Three Questions on Social Media

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

Full Court Press sought out the perspectives of some social media experts on how they would answer some of the challenges faced by social enterprises looking to build up a social media presence. We discovered diverse and varied ways to navigate some of the trickiest social media challenges— from building a presence, to facing the trolls, to finding success.

3x3 blog

First, What Advice do you have for a social enterprise or business that is starting toes into advocacy on social media?

Ginna Green, ReThink Media, Managing Director, Money in Politics and Fair Courts: Be authentic. Be strategic. Be patient. And understand the explicit reason you are engaging in social media beyond the fact that everyone is doing it. Social media can feel like it is its own world, and that is true to an extent. But it is the world that we make it, an extension of ourselves, our brands, our personalities, distilled, but also expanded. To me this means a requirement that we are always our most true selves, as individuals and organizations, and is probably even more true for brands and firms than for just folks.

Alicia Trost, Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART), Communications Manager: Hone your message and workshop it to death until it is where you want it. Don’t just jump in and start tweeting what you think. Everything should come from your strategy message. Have facts, data, and examples at the ready to use at any given moment. Make sure you know where you can quickly point folks to more information. Anything you would say to the media on the record can be said on social. Humanize or at least visualize your advocacy using videos, pictures and graphics.  

Don’t just send out canned messages and retweet, you HAVE TO engage and have a conversation with people. If you do it correctly and at the right time, people will look at your timeline and see how you responded. BART has received earned media about the conversations we have had on Twitter and how they incorporated our strategic messaging.  

Dan Cohen, Full Court Press Communications, Founder:  Leave nothing to chance.  Start slowly.  Be humble. Ask your customers or audience where they are, what tools they use, and how they want to engage with you.  Some social media tools prioritize one-way communications while others are meant for back and forth.  Choose wisely.  And if there is one thing we’ve learned, its that you should seek to perfect your approach by trial and error and measurement on one channel before starting another.  


The Rise of Hacker Philanthropy

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

hacker philanthropy
/ˈhakər/ fəˈlanTHrəpē/
noun – term used to describe a new generation of philanthropists who are working to solve the world’s most pressing problems

Hacker Blog Pic
Sean Parker speaks onstage during the launch of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

Based in Oakland, California, FCP is just a short drive away from some of the world’s most forward-thinking and cutting edge companies that call Silicon Valley home.  We hear people talk about being innovative a lot. And I mean a lot. Another bromide firmly embedded in Bay Area zeitgeist is the concept of “hacker culture,” which generally refers to technologist, engineers and inventors working to innovate on our break up the status quo. But lately, in our conversations with clients and reporters, we are hearing a new term come up with increasing frequency: “hacker philanthropy.”

Coined by Facebook investor billionaire Sean Parker, the term “hacker philanthropy” is meant to describe a new kind of philanthropist. Parker recently described the paradigm shift to the Financial Times: “I don’t even see it as giving away money as much as trying to solve a set of social or political problems that are not easily addressable with for-profit companies and investments.” Recently, Parker pledged $250 million to reshape the field of cancer immunology through the new Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.  Similarly, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan have pledged up to $1 billion shares of their Facebook stock to advance human potential and promote equality. Others in Parker and Zuckerberg’s cohort like Netflix’s Reed Hastings and Salesforce’s Marc Benioff have made similar pledges of support to some of the world’s most pressing problems.

According to an op-ed by Parker in the Wall Street Journal, “hackers share certain values: an antiestablishment bias, a belief in radical transparency, a nose for sniffing out vulnerabilities in systems, a desire to ‘hack’ complex problems using elegant technological and social solutions, and an almost religious belief in the power of data to aid in solving these problems.” Hacker philanthropists are applying these principals to philanthropy in the hopes of catalyzing more concrete change in the world.

360 Degree View: Experiential Marketing

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

SJSU

FCP team poses with the SJSU team following a successful SportsTech Symposium

We recently helped the amazing team at San Jose State University produce a SportsTech Symposium to explore how the evolution of sports technology has impacted the fan experience.

Scheduled to take place just 10 days before the Super Bowl, expectations were high and the excitement was palpable. In partnership with SJSU, we assembled an outstanding list of speakers that included experts in the fields of media, advertising, social media and fan experience optimization. The event covered topics such as: the business of sports journalism, the impact of social media on the fan experience and how sports marketing and advertising execs make decisions during events like SB50. 

3 tips to keep in mind when making videos

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

We all know that video is essential in any communications effort.  We asked our friend Stu Sweetow, the owner of  Audio Visual Consultants to share some of his wisdom.  Stu and his team are often called upon by Bay Area businesses and institutions (including UC Berkeley) to help capture some of their most important moments or to help shape a short video.   Here are three essential pieces of advice from Stu when shooting video on your own.

1. Make sure to use a microphone
mic pic
This is a clip-on microphone system that works with a smartphone and there are several other microphone options that work with digital cameras.  You want to help viewers to hear what you have to say. Relying on the camera to get you good sound usually yields disappointing results. Read Stu Sweetow’s Camcorder Magazine article about microphones for more of his wisdom.