Posts Tagged ‘storytelling’

Reporter Confidential: Reporting in the Time of Trump

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

Over a year into the Trump presidency, as we reflect on wild changes, the one constant has been Trump’s irresponsible and dangerous attacks on the press. An honest and diligent force for truth is more important than ever. So, one year in to this new administration, we’re reflecting on the ever-changing and yet evergreen role of the press. We sat down with local Pulitzer-winning reporters Dave DeBolt and Rob Salonga to hear their perspective on what it means to be a journalist during the Trump presidency.

 

East Bay Times reporters Matthias Gafni, Thomas Peele, Harry Harris, Erin Baldassari and David DeBolt react as they learn of their Pulitzer Prize win for breaking news at their office in downtown Oakland, Calif., on Monday, April 10, 2017. (Jane Tyska/Bay Area News Group)

Valentine’s Day: Reporters We Love

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

This Valentine’s Day, we’re sending some love to our friends and colleagues in journalism. We’re grateful to them for their hard work and efforts to inform and educate the public. To express our gratitude to the reporters we count on to bring us our news every day, we asked the Full Court Press team to spread the love to a reporter they appreciate this Valentines’ Day.

 

Dan’s sending some love to Marcus Thompson and Tim Kawakami:

Life would not be worth living without Marcus Thompson (@ThompsonScribe) and Tim Kawakami (@timkawakami) of The Athletic.  Each brings insight and thoughtful analysis to this unique moment in time in Golden State Warriors History.  They elevated my understanding of this team, Steve Kerr’s leadership philosophy, and the changes in the modern game.  In addition, I am impressed by their fearless entry into podcasting in 2016-17 and then venturing off to launch The Athletic in 2017.  

What the Media Wants: An Opinion Editor’s Opinion on Op-eds

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

Op-eds are one of the most powerful and persuasive tools you can use to reach your audience. Opinion pages are widely read by community leaders, elected officials, and other key decision-makers. One of Dan’s professors, Renee Hobbs once said, “the editorial page is where civic leaders go to have a discussion.”

Furthermore, the opinion page is a forum for individuals to publish their opinions.  Contrary to what you might think, your local newspaper WANTS to hear from you.

That being said, opinion editors do receive a lot of submissions— sometimes thousands — in a single week. So, you want your piece to be unique.

Some tips are fairly straightforward: make sure your piece doesn’t have typos, always spell and grammar-check, and always present something thoughtful and professional. But opinion editors also look beyond these basics when considering a piece for publication that may be less obvious to the uninitiated op-ed author.

We conferred with a local opinion pages editor we have worked with over the years, and are sharing four key elements editors look for when reviewing pieces submitted by local voices, as well as links to example op-eds that embody each element.

FCP Celebrates National Read a Book Day: What We’re Reading Now

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

This year, September 6th is National Read a Book Day which, for us at FCP, begs the question: Isn’t every day “Read a Book Day”? As an office of voracious readers, book recommendations and article links fly between desks often. In honor of National Read a Book Day, the FCP team is sharing some of their favorite recent reads, ranging from memoirs, to collected essays, to nonfiction. Pick up one of these books to celebrate “Read a Book Day”, every day, because the time is always ripe to learn more, pique curiosity, expand horizons, and share perspectives.  

 

Erin is Reading: A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Rebecca Solnit

In A Field Guide to Getting Lost, Rebecca Solnit defines the state of being lost as “when the world becomes larger than your knowledge of it.” With this, she strips the stigma from a word so easily characterized by a lack of direction and loss of control. Instead, she replaces it with connotations of empowered curiosity and actively wandering— “you’re going to get lost, and you’re going to be better for it. Go on … ”

It’s Solnit’s exploration of what it means to get lost on purpose that took me by the hand and pulled me deeper in. In her collection of essays, Solnit weaves together stories from her own personal history and relationships to tales of other “wanderers.” The narratives are as diverse in perspective as they are in their definition of disorientation. There are so many ways, beyond the physical sense, for a person to lose their way— and Solnit builds community in that.

A Bright Future for East Bay Students: Peralta Community College District Passes Torch for Career Pathways Consortium

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like, Uncategorized

 

The challenge: How can we communicate the efforts of multiple educational institutions working together to create pathways for students to college and career in one coherent story?

The lesson: sometimes people tell their own story best. When a project like East Bay Career Pathways is rooted in establishing relationships, building a community, and serving others, its narrative should reflect that by shining a spotlight on the people who made it possible.

 

Peralta Brochure 2

 

In 2014, the East Bay Career Pathways (EBCP) consortium, led by the Peralta Community College District, was awarded a $15 million grant from California Department of Education to develop a network of K-12, community college, and workforce intermediary organizations. The work aimed to connect the groups to build ‘career pathways’ that would link high school and college-aged students with the skills, resources, and training needed to take advantage of opportunities to work in in-demand fields in their community. This work is particularly needed in the Bay Area, where growing prosperity has not been shared by all, and often overlooks local communities. As their grant work drew to a close, EBCP partnered with Full Court Press to find a way to tell this story and share their successes.