Posts Tagged ‘public policy’

The Future Looks Fast

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

Last month, Full Court Press had the opportunity to support our client and friends from US Ignite at their annual US Ignite Application Summit in Austin, Texas. The three day summit showcases some of the country’s most forward thinking devices and applications for the world’s smart cities.

The deluge of information exchanged at the conference was somewhat overwhelming, so Caitlin Scott from our team (@caityscott) broke it down into the three top highlights about the next generation of smart, connected cities built on ultra high speed gigabit broadband infrastructure. From where we sit the future looks collaborative, fast, and diverse.

 

US Ignite Co-Founder and COO, Joe Kochan

 

Collaboration is Key

One of the many noteworthy panels at the US Ignite Application Summit featured technology officers from cities throughout the country. Each panelist had plenty of wisdom to share, but the pieces about collaboration stuck out in my mind.

Samir Saini, CIO of Atlanta pointed out that sharing and collaboration is a superpower among city leaders— I agree, and  would argue that sharing and collaboration is a superpower all humans possess but often underutilize. Seattle CIO Michael Mattmiller added onto this by saying that municipal CIOs are now being asked by local mayors and other elected officials to creatively use technology to solve non-technological problems such as closing the digital divide, leveraging big data to better serve the community, and more.

It may feel as though CIOs are being asked to solve the most pressing and intractable problems of communities. By collaborating and sharing knowledge across municipalities, CIOs in all corners of the country can learn from each other’s best practices and crowdsource solutions to solve these seemingly daunting problems. The US Ignite Applications Summit served as an excellent platform for relationship-building, knowledge-sharing, and an opportunity for experts to convene and learn from each other.

A Bright Future for East Bay Students: Peralta Community College District Passes Torch for Career Pathways Consortium

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like, Uncategorized

 

The challenge: How can we communicate the efforts of multiple educational institutions working together to create pathways for students to college and career in one coherent story?

The lesson: sometimes people tell their own story best. When a project like East Bay Career Pathways is rooted in establishing relationships, building a community, and serving others, its narrative should reflect that by shining a spotlight on the people who made it possible.

 

Peralta Brochure 2

 

In 2014, the East Bay Career Pathways (EBCP) consortium, led by the Peralta Community College District, was awarded a $15 million grant from California Department of Education to develop a network of K-12, community college, and workforce intermediary organizations. The work aimed to connect the groups to build ‘career pathways’ that would link high school and college-aged students with the skills, resources, and training needed to take advantage of opportunities to work in in-demand fields in their community. This work is particularly needed in the Bay Area, where growing prosperity has not been shared by all, and often overlooks local communities. As their grant work drew to a close, EBCP partnered with Full Court Press to find a way to tell this story and share their successes.

FCP Celebrates Teacher Appreciation Week

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like, Uncategorized

This week is National Teacher Appreciation Week, and while teachers around the country will be treated to apples on desks and Starbucks giftcards, here at Full Court Press we’re honoring teachers by reflecting upon the powerful impact a teacher can have. In our work with education organizations such as EducationSuperHighway, Peralta Community College District, and the California Acceleration Project, we’ve seen how much work is being done to try to improve education systems. One thing we can agree upon is the need to appreciate, encourage, and cultivate more life-changing teachers like the ones we celebrate today.

Today and every day, FCP celebrates a lifelong love of learning, and a deep appreciation for those who teach and cultivate it. We had the FCP staff share some reflections on teachers who have had a lasting impact on them below:   

shutterstock_70144576 SMALL

It Takes Two: A Conversation on FCP, Two Years Later

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

The Full Court Press team is celebrating a milestone this week: two years ago, Caitlin Scott (Senior Communications Counselor) and Audrey Baker (Communications Counselor) joined our team. A lot has changed over the past two years. Our state, our nation, and the world of communications are not the same. FCP sat down with Caitlin and Audrey to discuss how much has changed and what they’ve learned over the years.

Aniv blog

3 Ways to Protect Your Priorities and Passions in the Face of a Trump Presidency

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

The maxim that all politics is local will take on a new meaning in Trumpland. He is a leader with zero interest in details and his staff will spend four years fighting among themselves, all while Congress attempts to enact an agenda focused on GOP 101 (Tax Cuts, etc). In this environment, how can you win? And how can you use the upcoming holidays to prepare yourself and your teams?

Fight and Win Locally:  For non-profits and philanthropies, this first means identifying early “wins” to expand on what you’ve accomplished in the last eight years as you prepare for a different policy environment. Then it means pivoting to active defense of what matters most while continuing to relentlessly engage decision-makers on why your position is best for them. From 2000-2008, advocates in California fought and changed policies to provide voluntary, universal preschool at the local level and built towards statewide policy using policy, advocacy and local community wins in spite of a hostile presidency. How can you do the same?