Posts Tagged ‘philanthropy’

10 Lessons from 12 Years in Philanthropic Communications

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like, Uncategorized

A Full Court Press former client and friend Marc Moorghen recently left his role as Communications Director at the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation. With the announcement of this news, Marc reflected upon his time at the Hilton Foundation, in the world of philanthropy, and beyond. FCP is sharing his lessons below, as they resonated with us and reflect a shared philosophy on communications and professional growth. Thank you, Marc, for sharing your wisdom!

by Marc Moorghen
@moorghen 
linkedin.com/in/moorghen/  

Today was my last day at the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation. After more than a dozen years working to improve people’s lives around the world, I thought it would be fitting to share a few hard-earned lessons that I picked up along the way. Advice is easy to dispense, but I think these recommendations apply to both personal and professional situations.

Image result for moorghen hilton foundation

1) Do your homework: no matter the situation, do some research, so that you know what you’re dealing with. Expect the unexpected; plan as much as you can.

2) Know your audience: understand who you are addressing and why. Try to learn as much as you can about them, so you can appeal to both their heads and their hearts.

3) Put yourself in other people’s shoes: take the time to learn what makes people tick — their hopes, dreams, fears and desires. This will help you calibrate your message.

Trump’s Itchy Twitter Finger Making Charities Uneasy

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

by Rebecca Koenig (Story posted 13-Feb-2017)

A note from Full Court Press: Recently, our very own Dan Cohen was featured prominently in an interview with the Chronicle of Philanthropy concerning one of the most daunting challenges a nonprofit can face: a Trump Twitter strike.  We were also excited to see our friend Beth Kanter quoted extensively as well.

Blog Phil

Nonprofits worry about three kinds of tweets from President Trump: lies, attacks, and even endorsements.

Donald Trump has added an unexpected role to the American presidency: Tweeter-in-Chief.

His 140-character dispatches are notable not just for their tone (aggressive) and time of composition (early morning) but also for their ability to move markets — at least momentarily — and steer public attention. A tweet about Lockheed Martin sent the aerospace company’s stock down 5 percent. Another, about Toyota’s plan to make cars at a new factory in Mexico, evaporated $2 billion from the company’s market value.

That has nonprofit leaders worried about what will happen if the president uses Twitter to target their organizations. It is not a far-fetched scenario: In 2012, businessman Trump did just that, slamming the executive directors of the U.S. Fund for Unicef and the American Red Cross over their pay — and citing incorrect compensation figures.

Now, such outbursts carry the weight of the most powerful perch in the world, and that unnerves nonprofits. As Erin Hennessy, vice president at TVP Communications, notes, President Trump’s tweets usher in “extreme scrutiny from the public.”

Responding to nonprofits’ fears, communications firms are scrambling to provide guidance on dealing with the president’s digital bully pulpit. They’re advising charities to draft social-media posts in anticipation of various possible scenarios, set up phone trees to expedite communication with major donors, and run drills testing their crisis-communications plans.

Full Court Press, which counts foundations such as the California Endowment and nonprofits including Alliance for Justice among its clients, held a staff meeting last week on the topic of Mr. Trump’s tweets. The aim, principal Dan Cohen said, is to start “rebooting our social-media training for the new world order.”

The Rise of Hacker Philanthropy

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

hacker philanthropy
/ˈhakər/ fəˈlanTHrəpē/
noun – term used to describe a new generation of philanthropists who are working to solve the world’s most pressing problems

Hacker Blog Pic
Sean Parker speaks onstage during the launch of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

Based in Oakland, California, FCP is just a short drive away from some of the world’s most forward-thinking and cutting edge companies that call Silicon Valley home.  We hear people talk about being innovative a lot. And I mean a lot. Another bromide firmly embedded in Bay Area zeitgeist is the concept of “hacker culture,” which generally refers to technologist, engineers and inventors working to innovate on our break up the status quo. But lately, in our conversations with clients and reporters, we are hearing a new term come up with increasing frequency: “hacker philanthropy.”

Coined by Facebook investor billionaire Sean Parker, the term “hacker philanthropy” is meant to describe a new kind of philanthropist. Parker recently described the paradigm shift to the Financial Times: “I don’t even see it as giving away money as much as trying to solve a set of social or political problems that are not easily addressable with for-profit companies and investments.” Recently, Parker pledged $250 million to reshape the field of cancer immunology through the new Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.  Similarly, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan have pledged up to $1 billion shares of their Facebook stock to advance human potential and promote equality. Others in Parker and Zuckerberg’s cohort like Netflix’s Reed Hastings and Salesforce’s Marc Benioff have made similar pledges of support to some of the world’s most pressing problems.

According to an op-ed by Parker in the Wall Street Journal, “hackers share certain values: an antiestablishment bias, a belief in radical transparency, a nose for sniffing out vulnerabilities in systems, a desire to ‘hack’ complex problems using elegant technological and social solutions, and an almost religious belief in the power of data to aid in solving these problems.” Hacker philanthropists are applying these principals to philanthropy in the hopes of catalyzing more concrete change in the world.

Governance and Communications Webinar

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

On Leap Day, February 29, 2016, Olive Grove and FCP co-presented a dynamic 30-minute free webinar focusing on best communications practices for a productive relationship between an executive team and its board of directors. In case you missed it, here is the link to watch the webinar.

You can also read the 4 blogs below, and follow the hashtag #GovernanceComms on Twitter and Facebook!
 Three-Steps-to-Improve-Nonprofit-Board-Performance how-board-members-can-influence-and-grow-their-nonprofit-executive The-Three-Essential-Roles-of-Board-Members

A huge thank you to the team at Olive Grove and to everyone who participated in the webinar!

Three Steps to Improve Nonprofit Board Performance

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

Three-Steps-to-Improve-Nonprofit-Board-Performance

By: Anthony Tansimore 

Nonprofit executives sometimes find that their boards either underperform or not at all.  Some hope the magic bullet will be new board members who bring energy and a new commitment to the organization and are more engaged.  The dynamic of a low-functioning board rarely shifts with the addition of new people.  What results when nothing shifts is that the executive and board spiral into dysfunction.  The executive ignores the board or hides important matters from them, and the board becomes suspicious that the executive is doing something underhanded and they want to micromanage.  This hostility can last for a long time and both parties live with it, or the executive leaves on her own or at the urging of the board.  Board members fail to be effective stewards of the organizations they serve when executives take their power away.

The executive must determine how to get the best from her board rather than relegating them to the closet, which will hold the organization back.  The board can be a powerful partner with the executive in achieving the organization’s mission.  There are a few very simple steps an executive can take to ensure a productive relationship with her board and their effectiveness on behalf of the mission.

Be Clear About the Board’s Role and Expectations 

The simplest and most important thing an executive can do is to communicate expectations to the board.  Not once or twice, but all the time.  Having a clear job description for board members certainly creates greater understanding of the expectations, but ongoing communications about what the executive needs from her board gives them greater context for how they can serve the organization.