Posts Tagged ‘data’

The Future Looks Fast

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

Last month, Full Court Press had the opportunity to support our client and friends from US Ignite at their annual US Ignite Application Summit in Austin, Texas. The three day summit showcases some of the country’s most forward thinking devices and applications for the world’s smart cities.

The deluge of information exchanged at the conference was somewhat overwhelming, so Caitlin Scott from our team (@caityscott) broke it down into the three top highlights about the next generation of smart, connected cities built on ultra high speed gigabit broadband infrastructure. From where we sit the future looks collaborative, fast, and diverse.

 

US Ignite Co-Founder and COO, Joe Kochan

 

Collaboration is Key

One of the many noteworthy panels at the US Ignite Application Summit featured technology officers from cities throughout the country. Each panelist had plenty of wisdom to share, but the pieces about collaboration stuck out in my mind.

Samir Saini, CIO of Atlanta pointed out that sharing and collaboration is a superpower among city leaders— I agree, and  would argue that sharing and collaboration is a superpower all humans possess but often underutilize. Seattle CIO Michael Mattmiller added onto this by saying that municipal CIOs are now being asked by local mayors and other elected officials to creatively use technology to solve non-technological problems such as closing the digital divide, leveraging big data to better serve the community, and more.

It may feel as though CIOs are being asked to solve the most pressing and intractable problems of communities. By collaborating and sharing knowledge across municipalities, CIOs in all corners of the country can learn from each other’s best practices and crowdsource solutions to solve these seemingly daunting problems. The US Ignite Applications Summit served as an excellent platform for relationship-building, knowledge-sharing, and an opportunity for experts to convene and learn from each other.

Happy Centennial, National Park Service!

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

next100

This week we celebrated the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, the agency that oversees natural wonders like Yosemite, Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon. Public lands have played such an important role over the past century, and not just in the opportunities they provide for recreation and respite. National parks, forests, monuments and wildlife refuges protect natural and cultural heritage, keep our air and water clean, and provide economic benefits for local communities.

But if there’s one thing we’d like to see grow and develop over the next 100 years of the National Park Service, it’s representation — the face of today’s America reflected on public lands. According to a poll released this week by New America Media and the Next 100 Coalition, 95 percent of our country’s voters of color believe it is important for young people to see their cultures and histories reflected in America’s public lands. That’s why four out of five respondents say they approve of President Obama’s commitment to protecting national public lands, and believe it’s important for the next president to continue improving access to America’s most treasured places for people of all cultures and backgrounds.  

The poll surveyed 900 African American, Latino and Asian Pacific American voters nationwide and received extensive media coverage in the days leading up to the Aug. 25 Centennial. Its findings challenge a perception that communities of color are uninterested in national public lands, a misconception rooted in studies reporting lower rates of outdoor engagement than that of Caucasian Americans.

How to Be Successful with Data…and Messaging

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

Shosh blog- data and messaging

More and more, we are seeing that data plays a key role in strategic messaging for social change. When developing messaging for our clients, we find it useful to include data points that push their efforts towards success. Building solid messaging with just the right amount of data can influence how successful a campaign or initiative will be. Keeping the amount of data in your messaging so that it is clear and concise will go a long way.

In the field of education, we are seeing many of our clients rely on key data to ignite shifts in educational policy. With data points, education leaders and advocates are able demonstrate the needs for changes in educational policies, improvements to local schools, and resource allocations.

FCP has been fortunate to work with numerous educational advocacy groups and initiatives, and we have found that data can have a powerful impact when woven into the fabric the messaging.

$2.62 for every $1.00

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation asked FCP to help disseminate the first of its kind report for RAND Corporation on early-childhood education in California. This effort was in collaboration with education advocates from across the state. Our messaging highlighted that every dollar invested in pre-school produced $2.62 in payback for the public sector. This data point was essential for maximizing our client’s messaging impact. Advocates were able to leverage media attention and to succeed at engaging civic and community leaders by making this data point a centerpiece in their messaging.

The Human Side of Data (Answers to the test edition)

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Storytelling, Stuff We Like

So much of what we do at FCP is to help our clients generate news coverage to further an organizational mission.  This may include working to change the shape of a public debate, share an organization’s progress on important issues, or define a unique niche in the marketplace for a stellar product.

Last week, we were working with a news radio reporter on a segment related to powerful, first-of-its kind data. While impressed she was adamant when she said: “All this is great, but I need a human story to be able to share all this data.”