Posts Tagged ‘clients’

FCP Celebrates Teacher Appreciation Week

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like, Uncategorized

This week is National Teacher Appreciation Week, and while teachers around the country will be treated to apples on desks and Starbucks giftcards, here at Full Court Press we’re honoring teachers by reflecting upon the powerful impact a teacher can have. In our work with education organizations such as EducationSuperHighway, Peralta Community College District, and the California Acceleration Project, we’ve seen how much work is being done to try to improve education systems. One thing we can agree upon is the need to appreciate, encourage, and cultivate more life-changing teachers like the ones we celebrate today.

Today and every day, FCP celebrates a lifelong love of learning, and a deep appreciation for those who teach and cultivate it. We had the FCP staff share some reflections on teachers who have had a lasting impact on them below:   

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Happy Centennial, National Park Service!

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

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This week we celebrated the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, the agency that oversees natural wonders like Yosemite, Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon. Public lands have played such an important role over the past century, and not just in the opportunities they provide for recreation and respite. National parks, forests, monuments and wildlife refuges protect natural and cultural heritage, keep our air and water clean, and provide economic benefits for local communities.

But if there’s one thing we’d like to see grow and develop over the next 100 years of the National Park Service, it’s representation — the face of today’s America reflected on public lands. According to a poll released this week by New America Media and the Next 100 Coalition, 95 percent of our country’s voters of color believe it is important for young people to see their cultures and histories reflected in America’s public lands. That’s why four out of five respondents say they approve of President Obama’s commitment to protecting national public lands, and believe it’s important for the next president to continue improving access to America’s most treasured places for people of all cultures and backgrounds.  

The poll surveyed 900 African American, Latino and Asian Pacific American voters nationwide and received extensive media coverage in the days leading up to the Aug. 25 Centennial. Its findings challenge a perception that communities of color are uninterested in national public lands, a misconception rooted in studies reporting lower rates of outdoor engagement than that of Caucasian Americans.

Legal Cases as a Lever for Policy Change

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

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FCP has always provided counsel to attorneys to help ensure that a powerful verdict with deep public policy implications was heard far beyond the courtroom steps.  Here are three lessons we’ve learned along the way to make sure our client’s voice is heard in the public debate when an important case is filed or when a winning settlement or verdict is achieved.

Details Matter:  Too often, we think details (especially those containing lots of legalese) will make a reader’s eyes glaze over.  However, it’s often those very details that make the story easier for readers to understand.  In the case of gender discrimination, granular details of pay disparity can make the issue real for men and women alike.  Details of the unproven restraint procedures used by police in subduing mentally ill suspects can drive empathy and policy change in local communities.

Humanity Matters:  Legal cases often shed light on powerful stories of personal loss and suffering.  They can also shed light on a path or opportunity for redemption on important cultural issues. News coverage often resonates most when it tells human stories that tap into the zeitgeist of the moment (improper use of cell phones) or the failure of schools to protect vulnerable students on the Autism spectrum.  Ensuring important legal stories are told with humanity and clarity can drive the policy changes we all seek.

The Rise of Hacker Philanthropy

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

hacker philanthropy
/ˈhakər/ fəˈlanTHrəpē/
noun – term used to describe a new generation of philanthropists who are working to solve the world’s most pressing problems

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Sean Parker speaks onstage during the launch of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

Based in Oakland, California, FCP is just a short drive away from some of the world’s most forward-thinking and cutting edge companies that call Silicon Valley home.  We hear people talk about being innovative a lot. And I mean a lot. Another bromide firmly embedded in Bay Area zeitgeist is the concept of “hacker culture,” which generally refers to technologist, engineers and inventors working to innovate on our break up the status quo. But lately, in our conversations with clients and reporters, we are hearing a new term come up with increasing frequency: “hacker philanthropy.”

Coined by Facebook investor billionaire Sean Parker, the term “hacker philanthropy” is meant to describe a new kind of philanthropist. Parker recently described the paradigm shift to the Financial Times: “I don’t even see it as giving away money as much as trying to solve a set of social or political problems that are not easily addressable with for-profit companies and investments.” Recently, Parker pledged $250 million to reshape the field of cancer immunology through the new Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.  Similarly, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan have pledged up to $1 billion shares of their Facebook stock to advance human potential and promote equality. Others in Parker and Zuckerberg’s cohort like Netflix’s Reed Hastings and Salesforce’s Marc Benioff have made similar pledges of support to some of the world’s most pressing problems.

According to an op-ed by Parker in the Wall Street Journal, “hackers share certain values: an antiestablishment bias, a belief in radical transparency, a nose for sniffing out vulnerabilities in systems, a desire to ‘hack’ complex problems using elegant technological and social solutions, and an almost religious belief in the power of data to aid in solving these problems.” Hacker philanthropists are applying these principals to philanthropy in the hopes of catalyzing more concrete change in the world.

360 Degree View: Experiential Marketing

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

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FCP team poses with the SJSU team following a successful SportsTech Symposium

We recently helped the amazing team at San Jose State University produce a SportsTech Symposium to explore how the evolution of sports technology has impacted the fan experience.

Scheduled to take place just 10 days before the Super Bowl, expectations were high and the excitement was palpable. In partnership with SJSU, we assembled an outstanding list of speakers that included experts in the fields of media, advertising, social media and fan experience optimization. The event covered topics such as: the business of sports journalism, the impact of social media on the fan experience and how sports marketing and advertising execs make decisions during events like SB50.