Where We’re Donating For #GivingTuesday This Year

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

#GivingTuesday is a relatively new phenomenon, and one that the Full Court Press team is thrilled to get behind. After its inaugural year in 2012, Giving Tuesday became the type of trend we love to see around the holiday season— one which encourages altruism and reflection. An antidote-like balance to the consumerism often surrounding the holidays, groups have coalesced around causes they care about, creating new movements such as Small Business Saturday and Giving Tuesday. The day serves to kick off the charitable season of holiday and end-of-year giving and reorient the focus of the holidays to practicing generosity.

In the past, FCP has provided communications tips for organizations looking to take advantage of the trend by creating a deluge of support. This year, to mark the occasion, the FCP team is sharing some of the organizations we’re looking forward to donating to this holiday season.  

What the Media Wants: An Opinion Editor’s Opinion on Op-eds

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

Op-eds are one of the most powerful and persuasive tools you can use to reach your audience. Opinion pages are widely read by community leaders, elected officials, and other key decision-makers. One of Dan’s professors, Renee Hobbs once said, “the editorial page is where civic leaders go to have a discussion.”

Furthermore, the opinion page is a forum for individuals to publish their opinions.  Contrary to what you might think, your local newspaper WANTS to hear from you.

That being said, opinion editors do receive a lot of submissions— sometimes thousands — in a single week. So, you want your piece to be unique.

Some tips are fairly straightforward: make sure your piece doesn’t have typos, always spell and grammar-check, and always present something thoughtful and professional. But opinion editors also look beyond these basics when considering a piece for publication that may be less obvious to the uninitiated op-ed author.

We conferred with a local opinion pages editor we have worked with over the years, and are sharing four key elements editors look for when reviewing pieces submitted by local voices, as well as links to example op-eds that embody each element.

Grassroots Organizing on the Right Side of Justice: Lessons Learned from DeRay Mckesson

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

Last week, Full Court Press team member Caitlin Scott visited Inforum, an Innovation Lab at the Bay Area institution The Commonwealth Club. This event featured renowned activist DeRay Mckesson interviewed by Obama White House alumnus Dan Pfeiffer. Caitlin shares some key lessons and takeaways below.

Grassroots Organizing on the Right Side of Justice: Lessons Learned from DeRay Mckesson

 


DeRay Mckesson’s name is often in the news, and his weekly podcast “Pod Save the People” features robust and thoughtful discussions on current events — particularly those impacting marginalized communities. I admire DeRay’s ability to distill complicated and layered topics into a sensitive narrative that is digestible and actionable.

DeRay is one of my generation’s most important voices on American civil rights. He is a leader of the Black Lives Matter movement, a frequent target of conservative pundits, and one of less than a dozen people who Beyoncé follows on Twitter. But perhaps most importantly, DeRay has engaged a generation to advance racial justice at a time when the energy for political activism is electric, and the Trump administration is rapidly working to turn the clock back on civil rights.

While it would be a tall order to recount all of the wisdom DeRay imparted to his audience at the Commonwealth Club in a single blog post, here are the top five takeaways from DeRay for aspiring changemakers and grassroots organizers:

10 Lessons from 12 Years in Philanthropic Communications

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like, Uncategorized

A Full Court Press former client and friend Marc Moorghen recently left his role as Communications Director at the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation. With the announcement of this news, Marc reflected upon his time at the Hilton Foundation, in the world of philanthropy, and beyond. FCP is sharing his lessons below, as they resonated with us and reflect a shared philosophy on communications and professional growth. Thank you, Marc, for sharing your wisdom!

by Marc Moorghen
@moorghen 
linkedin.com/in/moorghen/  

Today was my last day at the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation. After more than a dozen years working to improve people’s lives around the world, I thought it would be fitting to share a few hard-earned lessons that I picked up along the way. Advice is easy to dispense, but I think these recommendations apply to both personal and professional situations.

Image result for moorghen hilton foundation

1) Do your homework: no matter the situation, do some research, so that you know what you’re dealing with. Expect the unexpected; plan as much as you can.

2) Know your audience: understand who you are addressing and why. Try to learn as much as you can about them, so you can appeal to both their heads and their hearts.

3) Put yourself in other people’s shoes: take the time to learn what makes people tick — their hopes, dreams, fears and desires. This will help you calibrate your message.

FCP Celebrates National Read a Book Day: What We’re Reading Now

Written by FCP Communications on . Posted in Stuff We Like

This year, September 6th is National Read a Book Day which, for us at FCP, begs the question: Isn’t every day “Read a Book Day”? As an office of voracious readers, book recommendations and article links fly between desks often. In honor of National Read a Book Day, the FCP team is sharing some of their favorite recent reads, ranging from memoirs, to collected essays, to nonfiction. Pick up one of these books to celebrate “Read a Book Day”, every day, because the time is always ripe to learn more, pique curiosity, expand horizons, and share perspectives.  

 

Erin is Reading: A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Rebecca Solnit

In A Field Guide to Getting Lost, Rebecca Solnit defines the state of being lost as “when the world becomes larger than your knowledge of it.” With this, she strips the stigma from a word so easily characterized by a lack of direction and loss of control. Instead, she replaces it with connotations of empowered curiosity and actively wandering— “you’re going to get lost, and you’re going to be better for it. Go on … ”

It’s Solnit’s exploration of what it means to get lost on purpose that took me by the hand and pulled me deeper in. In her collection of essays, Solnit weaves together stories from her own personal history and relationships to tales of other “wanderers.” The narratives are as diverse in perspective as they are in their definition of disorientation. There are so many ways, beyond the physical sense, for a person to lose their way— and Solnit builds community in that.